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Gilbert James (18651941)

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Fig. 2. Jamess illustration of verse 75 of the first edition of The Rubaiyat as it appeared in The Sketch, April 1st 1896, where it featured as the frontispiece of the Menu Card of the Omar Khayyam Club. It can be found in The Book of the Omar Khayyam Club (1910), p.54, and was for a dinner at Frascatis on 27th March 1896. The illustration was also used to illustrate verses 100 and 101 of FitzGeralds fourth edition in Smithers Fourteen Drawings (p.63) and as the Frontispiece of the Routledge photogravure edition of The Rubaiyat.



Fig. 3. Jamess illustration of verse 20 of the third, fourth and fifth editions of The Rubaiyat as it appeared in The Sketch, September 2nd 1896. Like Fig.2, it served as a menu card for the Omar Khayyam Club. It can be found in The Book of the Omar Khayyam Club (1910), p.62, and was for a dinner at Frascatis on 20th November 1896. Again like Fig.2, the illustration was also used in the Smithers edition (p.35) and as the illustration of verse 19 of FitzGeralds first edition in the Routledge photogravure Rubaiyat.



Fig.4: Jamess illustration of verse 12 of the third, fourth and fifth editions of The Rubaiyat as it appeared in The Sketch, December 23rd 1896. It never served as a menu card for the Omar Khayyam Club, but it was used in the Smithers edition (p.19) and as the illustration of verse 11 of FitzGeralds first edition in the Routledge photogravure Rubaiyat.



Fig.5: The first of Jamess illustrations of The Book of Ruth as it appeared in The Sketch for February 3rd 1897. It subsequently became the Frontispiece of the Routledge photogravure edition of The Books of Ruth and Esther published in 1905.



Fig.6a: The fifth of Jamess illustrations of The Book of Ruth as it appeared in The Sketch for March 3rd 1897. It subsequently became the illustration facing p.32 of the Routledge photogravure edition of The Books of Ruth and Esther published in 1905.



Fig.6b: Eve tempted by the Serpent, a Preston doctors protest against Fig.6a. It was published in the article The Devices of Gilbert James, in The Sketch, on March 24th 1897.



Fig.7: The fifth of Jamess illustrations of The Song of Songs as it appeared in The Sketch for June 17th 1896. It became the illustration facing p.62 in the Routledge photogravure edition of The Song of Songs published in 1906.



Fig.8: The third of Jamess illustrations of The Song of Songs as it appeared in The Sketch for May 27th 1896. This one did not subsequently feature in the Routledge photogravure edition of The Song of Songs published in 1906.



Fig.9: Jamess illustration to The Sad Story of Tristram and Isolt as it appeared in The Sketch for 8th March 1899, the lines being by Matthew Arnold. It subsequently became the illustration facing p.60 of the Routledge photogravure edition of Poems by Matthew Arnold, published in 1905.



Fig.10: The seventh (and last) of Jamess illustration to George Merediths Bhanavar the Beautiful as it appeared in The Sketch for 11th August 1897. The scene is from the very end of the story, where the heads of Ruark and Bhanavar are presented to King Mashalleed.



Fig.11: One of Jamess illustrations to Thomas Carlyles Nibelungen Lied as it appeared in The Sketch for 5th January 1898. The scene can be found in Carlyles Critical and Miscellaneous Essays (London: Chapman & Hall, London 1870), vol. 2, p.252.



Fig.12: One of Jamess illustrations on the theme of The Light Side of Nature, here The Mermaid: Ancient and Modern. It appeared in The Sketch for 1st April 1896. It is a nice example of Jamess humour.



Fig.13: One of several illustrations of poems which James did for The English Illustrated Magazine. This one illustrated a poem of the Earl of Rochester, and appeared in the issue for August 1896.



Fig.14: One of a series of twelve illustrations which James did on the theme of Superstitions of the Month for The English Illustrated Magazine. This one illustrated a superstition relating to May, and appeared in the issue for May 1895.



Fig.15: Dancers for the Temple (Japan) : One of Jamess illustrations to Frederick Dolmans article Dancing Girls of the East, as it appeared in The Idler, vol. 16 (Aug. 1899 Jan. 1900.)



Fig.16: An Indian Skirtdance : Another of Jamess illustrations to Frederick Dolmans article Dancing Girls of the East, as it appeared in The Idler, vol. 16 (Aug. 1899 Jan. 1900.)



Fig.17a: Within: one of a pair of illustrations by James published in The Pall Mall Magazine in December 1899, on facing pages Within on p.518 and Without on p.519. The former shows the comfortable festive celebrations of a group of portly, wellnourished monks; the latter Fig.17b: in contrast, shows an illnourished ordinary man suffering in the winter cold outside the monastery.



Fig.18: Jamess illustration Perplext no more &c (verse 41 of the 4th edition) appeared in the issue of The Tatler for Dec 10th 1902. This illustration did not appear in any book version of The Rubaiyat, but was used as a menu card by the Omar Khayyam Club in November 1902 (see note 1a.)



Fig.19: Jamess illustration Here with a Loaf &c (parody of v.11 of 1st edition) appeared in the issue of The Tatler for Feb 24th 1904. A nice example of Jamess humour, as is Fig.12 above.



Fig.20: Jamess illustration For in the Marketplace &c (v.36 of the 1st edition) appeared in the issue of The Sphere for Nov 11th 1905. This illustration was never used in any book version of The Rubaiyat.



Fig.21: Jamess illustration Strange, is it not ? &c (v.64 of the 4th edition) appeared in the issue of The Sphere for Aug 17th 1907. This illustration, like Fig.20, was never used in any book version of The Rubaiyat.



Fig.22: Jamess illustration of verse 3 of the 4th edition, as it appeared in the Smithers edition of Fourteen Drawings, p.11.



Fig.23a: Jamess illustration of verse 13 of the 4th edition, as it appeared in the Smithers edition of Fourteen Drawings, p.23. Jamess signature is to the left of the foot of the man sitting on the trellis, with the date 96 to the right of the foot; and Fig.23b: the same illustration as it appeared in the Altemus edition, facing p.56, minus Jamess signature.



Fig.24: Jamess illustration of verse 17 of the 4th edition, as it appeared in the Smithers edition of Fourteen Drawings, p.31.



Fig.25a: Jamess illustration of verse 82 of the 4th edition, as it appeared in the Smithers edition of Fourteen Drawings, p.59. Jamess signature is at the bottom right of the picture; and Fig.25b: the same illustration as it appeared in the Altemus edition, facing p.88, minus Jamess signature.



Fig.26a: A tinted version of Jamess illustration of verse 5 of the 4th edition, as it appeared in the R.F. Fenno & Co., New York, edition of 1908 (Potter #263.) The black and white original can be found in Smithers p.15, and facing p.20 in the Routledge / Dutton photogravure edition. Fig.26b: is a handcoloured version of the same, as it appeared in the Routledge deluxe edition. Here it illustrates verse 5 of the 1st edition.



Fig.27: Jamess frontispiece of the Foulis edition of 1907. It illustrates verses 6 and 7 of the 1st edition.



Fig.28: Jamess Persian design titlepage of the Foulis edition of 1907.



Fig.29: Jamess illustration of verse 42 of 1st edition, as it appeared in the Foulis edition of 1907.



Fig.30: Under the Peepultree: One of Jamess illustrations for Edith Hollands, The Story of the Buddha (1916).



Fig.31: The Buddha and the savage Elephant: another of Jamess illustrations for Edith Hollands, The Story of the Buddha (1916).



Fig.32: The Aged Faust: One of Jamess photogravure illustrations for Anna Swanwicks translation of Goethes Faust (1906).



Fig.33: The Path to the Brocken: Another of Jamess photogravure illustrations for Anna Swanwicks translation of Goethes Faust (1906).



Fig.34: Then entered in those Wisemen three, / Full reverently upon their knee: One of Jamess illustrations for a book of Christmas Carols (c.1906)



Fig.35: The Beehives: One of Jamess illustrations for an English translation (from Danish) of Carl Ewalds book The Queen Bee and Other Nature Stories (1907).



Fig.36: A Former Owner of the Jars: One of Jamess illustrations for M.R. Jamess ghost story, The Five Jars (1922).



Fig.37: Jamess frontispiece of A Selection from the Arabian Nights (c.1907). It depicts Aladdin and the African Magician.



Fig.38: One of Jamess black and white illustrations for A Selection from the Arabian Nights (c.1907). It depicts the African Magician offering new lamps for old in the story of Aladdin.



Fig.39: Jamess Frontispiece for Mind your own Buzziness (c.1912), a quirky book for children by the Roodletoot (W.J. Sanderson.)



Fig.40: Jamess depiction of Mr Roodletoot, from Mind your own Buzziness (c.1912), a quirky book for children by the Roodletoot (W.J. Sanderson.)



Fig.41: The cover of Jamess book for children, Toby and his Little Dog Tan, or the Great Detective of Fairy Land (1903), illustrated by Charles Pears.



Fig.42: Jamess frontispiece for Tristan and Iseult an Ancient Tale of Love and Fate (c.1911).



Fig.43: Priest making an Incantation over an Aztec Lady: one of Jamess illustrations of Lewis Spences Myths of Mexico and Peru (1913).



Fig.44: The Aged Quetzalcoatl leaves Mexico on a Raft of Serpents: another of Jamess illustrations of Lewis Spences Myths of Mexico and Peru (1913).



Fig.45: The Princess and the Gourd: another of Jamess (colour) illustrations of Lewis Spences Myths of Mexico and Peru (1913).



Fig.46: And Buddha taught the same Truths: Jamess Frontispiece for Ralph Waldo Trines book, In Tune with the Infinite (1926). The caption is not a quote from the book, but rather a summary of ideas expressed in various parts of the book (see p.76, p.1601 & p.1745.)



Fig.47: To be at one with God is to be at Peace: one of Jamess illustrations for Ralph Waldo Trines book, In Tune with the Infinite (1926). The caption is a quote from p.109, though the illustration itself faces p.32.



Fig.48: Can Joy drive away Old Age ?: another of Jamess illustrations for Ralph Waldo Trines book, In Tune with the Infinite (1926). The caption is not a quote from the book, but rather a summary of ideas expressed on p.5660. The illustration itself, though, faces p.64.



Fig.49: If Fear should enter, the House is undone: another of Jamess illustrations for Ralph Waldo Trines book, In Tune with the Infinite (1926). The caption is not a quote from the book, but rather a summary of ideas expressed on p.5155 and p.1157. The illustration itself, though, faces p.112.



Fig.50a: Clement Shorters bookplate by Walter Crane; and Fig.50b: Cranes bookplate for himself.



Fig.51a: The cover of the Smithers edition of Fourteen Drawings illustrating Edward FitzGeralds Translation of the Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam by Gilbert James (1898); and Fig.51b: the cover of the Smithers edition of A Book of Fifty Drawings by Aubrey Beardsley (1896).

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